The Best Festive Looks from 15 Talented Designers This Season

Lakme Fashion Week Winter-Festive 2018 has set the tone for what you wear this festive season. Here’s a glimpse at the some of the best shows at the event, and the key styles to watch out for.

Gaurang

Gaurang’s ‘Anupama’ collection (lead image) was inspired by the legendary South Indian star Savitri. He had recently also designed the costumes for the film Mahanati in May 2018 for the tri-lingual biopic on the actress, who was known for her great sense of style and glamour. Luxurious brocades, silks, organzas, hand woven sateens and chiffons came together in rich jewel tones.

lfw aw18.jpgAbraham and Thakore

Abraham & Thakore presented the first grand solo show with a collection titled ‘Cocktails and Samosas’. The Banarasi fabric was given a new interpretation as two shades of gold were inter-woven with black. Hand-embroidered tussar and reverse hand cut patterns in silk were combined with sequinned textures. The pieces included a brocade front wrap tie-up dress, kimono-style kurtas, peplum blouses, saris in gold and black brocade and an innovative half cape over a black blouse.

lfw aw182.jpgMonisha Jaising

Monisha Jaising presented the grand finale collection, titled ‘Shades of a Diva’, which opened with a power-packed performance by the nine artists of the world’s largest entertainment group, Cirque du Soleil. The creations showcased figure-sculpting silhouettes with use of precious elements and colourful fabrics, in muted shades like sweet lilac and bold ones like peacock green.

nupur kanoi.jpgNupur Kanoi

Nupur Kanoi’s ‘Protea’ collection explored the eclecticism of Cape Town, with its nautical, bohemian and chic aspect. Glass beadwork in geometrical  floral patterns was interestingly used to create optical illusion-like embroideries.

lfw aw183Nachiket Barve

Nachiket Barve used R|Elan, a specially engineered fabric, in his ‘Millennial Maharanis’ collection. Taking inspiration from the globetrotting Indian royalty of the twenties and thirties, he married the traditional with modern milieu with rich, premium, yet lightweight and fluid outfits.

urvashi joneja.jpgUrvashi Joneja

Urvashi Joneja’s collection ‘Away’ revolves around the imagery of flying away and breaking through the glass ceiling. With Rhea Chakraborty (left) playing showstopper, the key look played creatively with graphics as an unconventional merger of shattered fragments, which eventually came together as visuals of flying birds like eagles and parrots.

am-pm.jpgAM:PM

Ankur and Priyanka Modi’s ‘Gypset’ collection was aimed at the jet-setting, free-spirited but sophisticated dresser. The collection also paid homage to Julia Chaplin, the neo-hippie of global fame who coined the term ‘Gypset’. Keeping Indian-wear in mind, the pair interpreted them as tunics, shirt dresses and salwars that were turned into flared pants, while long coats were given a fashionable twist with lapels. Fabrics such as silk, wool and organza were embellished with stone, leather and lush embroidery, sometimes with rustic motifs.

lfw aw186.jpgPayal Singhal

Payal Singhal’s collection called “Mu’asir” (modern or contemporary in Persian) was an ode to the modern bride. It derived its inspiration from folk art tapestry, including elements such as flat weaving loose fringes, pastel and bright colours, and bold patterns. The colour palette was varied, from neutral grey, ivory and pastels to jewel tones such as emerald and deep purple. Silhouettes included shararas, concept sari dhotis and layered jackets, in fabrics such as luxurious silks, georgettes and organzas. Key looks included tiny cholis with multi-coloured embroidered lehengas, tiered shararas, ruffled-edged net saris.

eka.jpgEka

Eka’s collection ‘Lived In’ continued its love affair with handspun khadi, wool, cotton and linen, this time in patterns like stripes, checks, borders and hand block prints. The focus was on Soojni embroidery from Kashmir and on diaphanous materials layered over more solid checked or colour-blocked inners. The silhouettes were functional, comfortable and relaxed, giving the pieces a timeless quality.

lfw aw188.jpgaLL x Narendra Kumar

The aLL Primero x Narendra Kumar show, targeting plus-size fashionistas, featured modern athleisure, day and evening wear in quick succession with a multitude of fabrics like Ponte Roma, Interlock knit, jacquard, Terry wool, Looper knit, Moss crêpe and cotton linen. One could also spot bright denim along with sequinned satin.

lfw aw187.jpgArpita Mehta

Arpita Mehta’s ‘La Fleur’ collection had the ‘twirl with the wind’ feel, with a focus on prints, particularly floral hydrangeas along with strong accents on geometric and linear stripes. The ensembles were aimed at the power dresser constantly on the move, so Arpita brought in fluid kaftan capes, a sprinkling of tiered ruffled pants, some figure-contouring body suits and sexy bralettes.

Chola.jpgChola

Sohaya Mishra’s Chola label presented an esoteric, gender-neutral collection ‘Bye Felicia’, with female models in moustaches and men in lipstick. Grey, black and white dominated the colour palette with hints of other colours, while flamboyant layering and asymmetric silhouettes took up pride of place on the ramp.

lfw aw1892.jpgRitu Kumar

Ritu Kumar’s ‘Native Spirit’ collection was a colourful ode to nature and the great outdoors. The rainbow-like grandeur of Native American life merged with the rustic charm of the Inca civilization and a hint of the Wild West, through leather braiding, metal accents, and corduroy dungarees teamed with printed tops.

lfw aw189.jpgGEN NEXT

Upcoming designer Kanika Sachdev’s Jajaabor label (left) presented ‘The Artful Lodger’ unveiling ensembles in khadi, cotton, chanderi silk and silk organza inspired by homestay stories from around the world, while Ajay Kumar Singh’s label AUR (right) presented garments with prints and embroideries inspired by the imaginative illustration of mentally challenged children.

First published in the October 2018 issue of eShe magazine